Plans for Mumbles Lifeboat Station redevelopment unveiled

A NEW visitor centre and pop-up restaurant are planned at the old Mumbles lifeboat station.
And a cafe and kiosk in two pavilion buildings halfway along Mumbles Pier have also been proposed.
The scheme submitted to Swansea Council by pier-owning firm Ameco is part of wider plans to refurbish the grade two-listed pier, and build foreshore flats, headland hotel rooms and a new boardwalk.
The RNLI decamped from the old lifeboat station when the RNLI completed a new one at the end of the grade two-listed pier in 2015.

Under the plans, the old lifeboat station’s familiar cream and red exterior will remain as it is, but the interior will be remodelled to provide a visitor centre, exhibition space and a pop-up restaurant.

A rolling gangway will also be built, using the existing launch slipway.

And the connecting walkway from the old lifeboat station to the pier will be replaced, while new gates are to be installed at the pier entrance.

Bert Bollom, of Ameco, said: “We’ve got quite a few things in the air at the moment.
“It’s a bit hectic but it’s great to see the vision coming together.”

Work to restore the stem of the pier, which is currently closed, has been under way since last June.
Ameco said it hoped to open the pier temporarily this summer. Preparatory work to create the extended boardwalk from the pier along the foreshore to Mumbles Amateur Rowing Club is also expected to get under way at the same time.

For More Great News Stories Click The Banner

This boardwalk will create extra space for people on foot and allow for the construction of the 26 foreshore flats.

Planning permission for the £35 million pier, foreshore and headland redevelopment was granted last December after a late intervention by Welsh ministers, who concluded that no new planning issues had been raised.

Objectors had argued strenuously against approval at an earlier planning committee, citing parking issues among others.

Councillor Richard Lewis said the 120-year-old pier needed modernising, and that going on a site visit there had reminded him of going to Rhyl or Trecco Bay in the 1950s.

“It was awful,” he said.

error: You are in breach of copyright
%d bloggers like this: